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Our understanding of disease movement in prisons and jails is incredibly limited. This model provides an important combination of standard epidemiology modeling with what we know about spread in facilities, so that corrections leaders can make decisions that are critical to protecting incarcerated people, staff, and the public health infrastructure of our communities.

Gregg Gonsalves
PhD, Professor of Epidemiology, Yale University Department of Public Health
There is an opportunity here to do something that no one has done before and would be of great service to corrections health: quantify aspects of risk based on spatial configuration of prisons, how those incarcerated are housed, and the frequency and nature of contacts
Ribhav Gupta
Graduate Student, Department of Epidemiology, Stanford University School of Health
This is an absolutely terrific model and very needed.
Kristofer (Bret) Bucklen
PhD, Director, Bureau of Planning, Research & Statistics, Pennsylvania Department of Corrections
David Edwards
Director, Office of Research, Planning and Process Improvement, Missouri Department of Corrections
Ben Packer
PhD, Software Engineer, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Fairness, Google
Erin Boyar
Principal Planner, Planning and Research Unit, Rhode Island DOC
Richard Vyncke
Associate Director, Office of Planning & Analysis, Colorado DOC
Morgan Jackson
Senior Professional Research Assistant, Office of Planning & Analysis, Colorado DOC
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Note: Our understanding of the virus is rapidly evolving; for the most up-to-date epidemiological and state data, pull the latest version of this model daily